The Changing Face of National Security: Critical Infrastructure

On July 11, 2017, in Anti-terrorism, Canada, Public Safety and National Defence, by senjaffer

With the 21st century, our way of viewing national security has changed. Discussions on national security are shifting to address a new vulnerability for Canada: our dependence on certain assets in our everyday lives! For example, we expect continuous use of electricity for our appliances and buildings, we need telecommunications systems to email or call […]

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Democratic Rights, Part 3 – Voting Rights in the Modern Day

Every citizen of Canada has the right to vote in an election of the members of the House of Commons or of a legislative assembly and to be qualified for membership therein. In my previous blog, I outlined how the democratic rights from Sections 3 to 5 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms […]

Eid Mubarak!

On June 29, 2017, in Citizenship and Immigration, Diversity and Multiculturalism, by senjaffer

This is a very auspicious week, as we celebrated one of the biggest Muslim holidays – Eid Al Fitr, and Multiculturalism day! Eid Al-Fitr signifies the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. This makes Eid one of my favorite holidays in the Muslim calendar, because it is a time to celebrate personal […]

Women in the Canadian Armed Forces: Recruitment

Today, I will return to a topic that I have covered in several previous posts, and will continue to repeat: the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) is struggling to meet its goals for female representation, and is showing few signs of improvement. In fact, the Auditor General released a report in 2016 which stated that the […]

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Democratic Rights, Part 2 The Evolving Charter

In my last entry for this series, I demonstrated how the democratic rights outlined in sections 3-5 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms were designed to prevent the return of laws from Canadian history that either disenfranchised specific groups or interfered with the fairness of elections. However, by the time the Charter was […]

Women in the Canadian Armed Forces

On June 22, 2017, in Canada, Public Safety and National Defence, Women's Rights, by senjaffer

In yesterday’s blog, I took the opportunity to cover Canada’s difficulties in reaching out to its multicultural population. However, it is worth noting that the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF)’s challenges do not end there- it also struggles to recruit and retain women- particularly in the Royal Canadian Air Force, where women only make up 8.9% […]

Diversity in the Canadian Armed Forces

As Deputy Chair of the Standing Committee on National Security and Defence, I have had the opportunity to study several of the important issues affecting our Canadian Armed Forces as a part of our greater study of the Defence Policy Review. The results of this study can be found in two of our most recent […]

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Democratic Rights, Part 1 Introduction

Starting this week, this blog series will be moving on to a new set of rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms: The democratic rights under Sections 3 to 5! This week, I will provide a general overview of these democratic rights, which will act as context for the next entries in the […]

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Fundamental Freedoms, Part 5 Major Court Cases

Frequent readers of this series might notice a common theme among the entries I have posted so far. In each section, I outlined how the fundamental freedoms in Section 2 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms go beyond their literal meaning. In particular, parts 2 and 3 of this series showed how the […]

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Fundamental Freedoms, Part 4 The Charter in our daily lives

In my last blog entries, I have mainly focused on how the fundamental freedoms in Section 2 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms have changed Canada on a societal level. This is because of the Charter’s nature. The Charter can only compel action from governments in Canada. It cannot affect the actions of […]