UN Resolution 1325: Women, Peace and Security

When I was a little girl, I clearly remember my mother reading poems to me about young men travelling to the battlefields to fight in the war. I remember listening to how they would travel through the trenches and how their bodies lay dead in the muddy fields.

Now, when I read poems to my children about war, there is a stark difference. War has come into our communities and into our homes, literally and figuratively. For those lucky enough, war has come to their homes only by television. Others are not so fortunate. The Rwandan genocide, the war in Sierra Leone, the conflict in the Congo – these are no longer wars fought on a battlefield; rather, they have come to our streets and backyards, directly affecting our men, women, boys and girls.

On October 31st 2000 the United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security. This resolution specifically addresses the impact armed conflict has on women and girls. It calls for not only for women’s full and equal participation in decision making but ensures that’s the rights of women and girls are protected. Resolution 1325 is the first of its kind to deal exclusively with issues of women’s peace and security, and results from many years of intense work. As Kofi Annan stated, “Just as your work can promote gender equality, so can gender equality make your work more likely to succeed.”

In Canada, both government and civil society have a clear desire to see Resolution 1325 implemented to the fullest possible extent.

The changing face of war has brought us new challenges, and we must recognize the importance of 1325 in meeting these challenges and the role of women in contributing to the critical task of building sustainable peace for all.

We must work together to make Resolution 1325 a living reality.

Supporting Resolutions

Resolution 1325 has been strengthened by four additional resolutions, all of which uniquely deal with impact armed conflict has on women.

  • Resolution 1820, which was adopted in 2008, deals with sexual violence in armed conflict. It officially recognizes “sexual violence as a war crime and crime against humanity.” The main objective of this resolution is to not only protect women and girls from sexual violence but to also to ensure an end to impunity of the perpetrators.
  • Resolution 1888, which was adopted in 2009, institutes more vigorous implementing commitments for Resolution 1325. In particular, it mandates peacekeeping missions to protect women and girls from sexual violence in armed conflict.
  • Resolution 1889, which was adopted in 2009, targets post-conflict peace-building and condemns continuing sexual violence against women in conflict and post-conflict situations.
  • And lastly, Resolution 1960, which was adopted in 2010, calls for the establishment of monitoring, analysis, and reporting arrangements specific to conflict-related sexual violence.

These resolutions demonstrate the Security Council’s recognition of the horrifying realities of gender issues in armed conflict. They have assisted in bringing this issue to the forefront of the international community’s agenda. However, beyond resolutions and recognition of the problem, more needs to be done to ensure the goals of Resolutions 1325, 1820, 1888, 1889, and 1960 are achieved.

Related Links

Adopted Supporting Resolutions PDF Files

UNSCR 1325 (2000)

UNSCR 1820 (2008)

UNSCR 1888 (2009)

UNSCR 1889 (2009)

UNSCR 1960 (2010)

Speeches

Educate, Enable, and Empower
By Senator Mobina Jaffer
Soroptimist International Great Britain and Ireland 78thAnnual Conference (2012)

Senate Chamber Interventions by Senator Mobina Jaffer

Questions

Senate Chamber Question – Tuesday, October 2, 2012
Rights of Women and Girls

Delayed Answer – Wednesday, December 12, 2012
Delayed Answer – The Rights of Women and Girls

Senate Chamber Question – Wednesday, June 6, 2012
Afghanistan — Women’s Rights

Delayed Answer – Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Delayed Answer – CIDA – Afghanistan – Women’s Rights
Delayed Answer – Tuesday, September 25, 2012
Delayed Answer – DFAIT – Afghanistan – Women’s Rights

Senate Chamber Question – Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Gender-specific Training in Afghanistan

Delayed Answer – Tuesday, September 27, 2011
Delayed Answer – Gender-specific Training in Afghanistan

Statements

Senate Chamber Statement – Friday, March 25, 2011
Participation of Women in Peace Processes

Senate Chamber Statement – Wednesday, May 13, 2009
Sri Lanka

Senate Chamber Statement – Tuesday, March 10, 2009
International Women’s Day

Senate Chamber Statement – Wednesday, December 3, 2008
Violence Against Women and Girls in Conflict

Senate Chamber Statement – Tuesday, February 27, 2007
International Women’s Day

Senate Chamber Statement – Thursday, June 8, 2006
Effect of Conflict on Women

Senate Chamber Statement – Tuesday, December 14, 2004
Women, Peace and Security – Second Annual Symposium

Senate Chamber Statement – Wednesday, November 3, 2004
Violence Against Women

Senate Chamber Statement – Wednesday, March 10, 2004
United Nations Commission on Status of Women

Senate Chamber Statement – Thursday, February 26, 2004
United Nations – Fourth-Eighth Session on Status of Women

Senate Chamber Statement – Thursday, October 30, 2003
United Nations – Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security

Senate Chamber Statement – Thursday, November 7, 2002
United Nations Security Council – Second Anniversary of Resolution on Women, Peace and Security

Senate Committee Reports

Training in Afghanistan: Include Women
Report – Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights (December 2010)

Canada’s Role: Enabling women to be decision-makers in peace and security matters.
News Release – Ottawa (November 18, 2010)
The Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights

A Stone in the Water
Report of the Roundtables with Afghan-Canadian Women On the Question of the Application UN Security Council Resolution 1325 in Afghanistan
Canadian Committee on Women, Peace and Security (July 2002)

Too Little Has Changed
Report of the Follow-Up Meetings with: The Roundtables were conducted with the Financial Support from the Human Security Program of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Canada Afghan-Canadian Women On the Application of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 In Afghanistan
Canadian Committee on Women, Peace and Security

 

 

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